Monday, May 9, 2011

Promoting Complete Streets and Context Sensitive Solutions

Complete Streets are designed to be safe and comfortable for all users, including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, motorists and individuals of all ages and capabilities. Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) is a approach to transportation system and road design that involves all stakeholders in designing transportation facilities that fit with their setting and surrounding land use.

Should Winston-Salem/Forsyth County pursue Complete Street and Context Sensitive Solutions as part of our transportation policy?

Give us your thoughts -- click "comments" below:

12 comments:

Henry H. Lafferty, AIA, said...

Absolutely, W-S should pursue this as a goal.

Winston-Salem has staked itself to developing as a community with a goal of attracting the "creative class". The key to the success of attaining this goal is to develop with choices.

As a bicyclist, if i am riding on a road where that is pedestrian friendly, then usually i feel safe. I don't require a dedicated lane.

And transit is key! I lived in Sherwood Forest and made the decision to move because I the last scheduled bus to return to my neighborhood was at 3:30 pm and the stop was 1 1/2 miles from my house. Obviously not a workable solution.

Rail line up and down Stratford Rd has enormous possibilities for connecting other centers. True, the NC Railroad Assoc & CSX would have to be dealt with, but besides running a streetcar or trolley from Hanes Mall Blvd to 1st/Country Club or even to Northwest Blvd/Reynolda, developing bicycle and pedestrian routes would have a significant impact

The Creative Corridors Coalition, in exploring options for Bus 40 has an opportunity to elevate the discussion in terms of connectivity with bridges - not to mention the enormous opportunity to knit east/west Winston.

Lee L. French said...

Absolutely - I agree with these solutions and approve the use of such policies.

Judi Wallace said...

Yes! We need to consider ALL street users i our designs. Our current motor-vehicle-centric design discriminates against children, older adults, the disabled, and residents who can't afford cars. With the older segment of the population rapidly increasing, the discrimination will be even greater.

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

Absolutely, the Lewisville Comprehensive Plan 2010 includes language in support of this concept.

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

Why not?

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

YES - hasn't Charlotte pursued one?

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

Yes - safe biking, pedestrian, and transit options should be routinely required. Site transit stops & pedestrian intersection crossings are also necessary.

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

Bicycle & pedestrian lanes are important, but can be developed over time.

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

Of course

From Our June 7th Meeting... said...

Sure

Anonymous said...

Yes. Currently we have a bit of a problem with motorist and cyclist. There's little room bicycles on our streets. I'll admit I'm one of those motorist who gets frustrated when following them, especially during rush hour. I find it interesting that cyclist want motorist to share the road but few of them obey traffic laws or yield any space. And most are using the roads for recreaion and exercise rather than for transportaion. Safer streets may encourage more bike comuters and would help with traffic flow.

JRL said...

If it can be shown to reduce sprawl and provide cleaner air and water, yes.