Monday, June 6, 2011

Public Art

Public art not only provides landmarks in a community (such as the Salem coffeepot), it also enhances the appearance and enjoyment of a community.

What are the tools and who are the partners who need to collaborate to create a Public Art Master Plan for the entire county, including our rural and various ethnic histories?

Should public art be a feature that helps create more interactive community spaces?


Give us your thoughts -- click "comments" below:

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think the art in downtown Winston-Salem adds character to our community. With the School of the Arts and the downtown revitalization, the murals are well placed for the visitors who spend time here to enjoy.

smallville said...

we don't have the money to spend on wall murals at this time. If an artist is willing to paint them for the opportunity to promote their own publicity, then we should consider that offer.

Anonymous said...

The coffee pot was a commercial sign, it has survived and been moved but was never a public art piece.

We should have better integration of art with public projects such as traffic circles, schools, fire stations, bridges, and median strips.

Lee L. French said...

First and foremost, the Public Art Master Plan must be accepted and embraced by elected officials. Additionally, we should engage private sector and institutions to ensure there is community-wide buy-in for this very important quality-of-life element.

Anonymous said...

Tax money shouldn't be used but if an artist wants to make something look better we should let them.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Elected officials, so far, shy away from public art - as if it is too controversial or too unimportant. We need their involvement. They feel responsive to voters.
Therefore, neighborhood associations, church groups, all kinds of non-profits, businesses and schools/colleges are good locations for voices that will be heard by public officials - Oddly, the Arts council has not organized outreach efforts to these varied constituencies, except to ask for $ for its own interests. We need a new group, like Creative Corridors, to lead the way. (The Arts Council did play a huge role in getting Creative Corridors underway and could be important in starting a Creative Arts Coalition.)

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

UNC School of the Arts
Design firms such as Shapiro or M Creative
Wake Forest & WSSU's art departments
Young entrepreneurs such as John Blackburn of Krankies & Lawren Desai of Aperture
Consider incorporating permanent and temporary works/events with partners like River Run and the theatre festival.
Make this a priority! Avoid "sameness syndrome" so that Winston-Salem is different and unique.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Yes, public art is important and should be supported by the community

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Typical suspects - Arts Council, UNCSA/WFU/ SAC/WSSU, museums, local artists, school system (arts based schools), CAC

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Involve UNCSA students! This would get all sorts of people involved in the community.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

WS/FC Schools should be a partner. Student artistic talents should be a part of the aesthetic image of the community. It's a great way to get students involved with service learning too.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Yes

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

The Arts Council, Piedmont Craftsman, UNCSA, WSSU, Wake Forest, Salem College, Forsyth Tech students should be included in the planning & promotion & display of appropriate public art.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Creative Corridors Coalition

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Public art should be everywhere!
No light pollution disguised as art

Brian Perons said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
brian1625 said...

Yes, Winston-Salem should look alive and vibrant. Public art is the best way to achieve that.

Anonymous said...

We should consider all communities and its contribution to the City of Arts and incorporate more Art.

JRL said...

Local utilities and transportation folks should be included as historical and community identity sites have been bulldozed which allowed more recent developments.

JRL said...

It can be if it does not distract from the natural environment’s characteristics and it does no harm to the natural environment. Art must be “green” to be good.