Monday, May 16, 2011

Preservation of Industrial Land

The potential loss of land designated for future industrial development is a serious problem facing Forsyth County, especially given the small size of the county and the small amount of developable land left.

What strategies should be considered to preserve designated sites for economic development?

Give us your thoughts -- click "comments" below:

8 comments:

Henry H. Lafferty, AIA, said...

Promotion of industrial growth into green field areas is in my opinion a BAD idea. We keep developing new rings of industry. This only promotes sprawl We need to grow in density - industry need to be accessible to the workforce. Redevelopment of existing industrial areas has to be the way we begin to respond to the need.

Anonymous said...

The Kernersville Community would love to be involved in a Trolly System as part of Forsyth County. WE have some great ideas to impliment this system and are in the planning stages.
Allan Asbell
Chairman
CAC

Lee L. French said...

Continuing to protect parks and historic sites is an important element to consider when identifying areas for economic development.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Rezone according to master plan but allow deferral or adjust tax assessment until land is sold; charge full cost of utilities to developers

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Depends on where they are I guess.

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Locations with access to transportation should be prioritized

From Our June 7th Meeting… said...

Move sites to inner city area - not on fringes of the county. This encourages sprawl.

JRL said...

None if they are outside existing city limits. Focus entirely on re-development. There are plenty of blighted sites and abandoned buildings inside corporate city limits. We should never again use city-county utility funds for land acquisitions, etc. like was done with DELL. Such a practice is highly unethical if a few connected folks got richer off public-private venture land deals. Public-private partnerships should be abolished as these have led us to our current state of sprawl and loss of farmlands. Egregious impacts to the environment and to smaller communities have occurred from such activities due to local conflicts of interests (i.e. Ridgewood Road Business Park sediment impacts to wetlands, Construction of Union Cross Business Park Sewer Main without an Environmental Policy Act review, Ecojustice effects to rural Union Cross from DELL and subsequently from Cat). There should be no use of public funds or public staff (i.e. previous CCPB maps of farmlands showing potential industrial sites in rural areas) without the provision of an upfront environmental assessment for the activity.